The JJIF currently holds competitions in three different styles of ju-jitsu. These are ne-waza, also known as Brazilian jiu-jitsu, the fighting system and the duo system.



Ne-Waza

Ne-Waza has heavy focus on ground fighting and submissions. The discipline is hugely popular around the world and seen in professional MMA promotions such as the Ultimate Fighting Championship.

It was included by the JJIF in 2010 and first featured at the World Games in 2013.

Punches and kicks are not allowed in Ne-Waza, with most of the fight on the floor.

The goal is to win by submission with a lock on the joints or strangulation, or by points.

During a period of six minutes, it is possible to gain points for throws, takedowns, controlling positions and certain actions that give an advantage in the progression of the fight.

The Ne-Waza system is also called "human chess" due to its strategic and tactical nature.


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Fighting system

The fighting system splits combat into three different parts.

In part one, athletes are involved in distant combat with their arms and legs, including kicks and punches.

Once a strike has been made, the bout enters into part two.

Fighters then try to bring each other down with various throwing techniques, with points awarded for how effective the manoeuvres are.

Once on the floor, the fight can enter the third stage.

Points are given here for submission techniques which cause an opponent to yield.

The winner is the athlete who gains the most points from the duration of the fight.

If a fighter performs a perfect technique in all three parts, they win automatically by ippon.

Example of moves registering ippon include an unblocked punch or kick, a perfect throw or takedown or forcing your opponent to tap out to a submission move.

Fighting ju-jitsu demonstrates a number of different techniques over three parts ©JJIF
Fighting ju-jitsu demonstrates a number of different techniques over three parts ©JJIF


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Duo System

The duo system features two athletes from the same team who demonstrate techniques of self defence against a series of 12 attacks.

These are randomly called my the mat referee and can include situations such as grip attacks, neck locks, punches, kicks and armed attacks, for example with a stick or knife.

Athletes are judged for their speed, accuracy, control and realism across the male, female and mixed categories.

Judges look for skills such as power, control, effectiveness, attitude, speed and variability.

Scores are given between zero and 10, by five judges.

The lowest and highest scores are then taken away in a bid not to count mistakes.

The duo system features two athletes from the same team demonstrating moves together ©JJIF
The duo system features two athletes from the same team demonstrating moves together ©JJIF